Archive for the ‘History’ Category
Page 1 of 5 1 2 3 4 5
Viewing Options List View Grid View

Do you keep your word? Or are you an “indian giver?”

indian giverDo you keep your word? Or are you an “Indian Giver?”  Do you even know what that means?

When I was a child, the term “Indian giver” was thrown around as a derogatory term when someone gave something and then wanted it back.

At the time, I thought it meant that Native Americans used to do that: give gifts then take them back.

But I was wrong.

The origin of the term is a bit murky: there are references back in the 1790s of Europeans complaining about Natives asking for remuneration for things they gave the Europeans.

Why would the Europeans complain about that? Why wouldn’t they expect to give a fair exchange?

The problem with humility is that…

humilityBear Heart used to joke that, “It’s hard to have humility because you can’t brag about it – if you’re really humble.”

That’s true. But of course, the truly humble person wouldn’t even want to brag.

What’s the opposite of humility?

I have occasionally met people who loved to talk about their accomplishments to the point that a conversation with them is a conversation about them.

A simple, “How are you?” can lead to a 5 minute monologue on their recent achievements.

I can only assume that stems from a deep-seated lack of self-worth; why else would a person feel a need to work so hard to validate themselves in your eyes?

It shows that they don’t understand the simple tenet that people will judge you by your actions, not what you say about your actions.

Words to live by from Martin Luther King

martin luther kingMartin Luther King, Jr. was an American pastor, activist, humanitarian and leader in the Civil Rights Movement who was assassinated in Memphis, Tennessee on April 4, 1968.

He won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964.

This past Monday in the U.S. commemorated his life and Facebook was full of quotes from him.

Frankly, I hadn’t heard many of them before, and they are very inspiring.

If you subscribe to my blog, and received my thank-you gift of “What Lies Within You; Inspirational Quotes to Lift Your Spirits”, you know I am passionate about inspiring quotes.

Often just a few well-phrased words can be deep with meaning and advice.

We can never get too much inspiration, so I felt a post filled with his words would both honor Dr. King and be the best inspiration I could give my readers this week:

I heartedly encourage you to take some of these words into your heart as guidance to live by.

Winter Solstice – why it’s the true New Year!

 

Winter Solstice

The sun enters Newgrange on the Winter Solstice

Winter Solstice is the day when light is reborn out of the darkness of winter.  Our days start to become longer and lead us back to the beauty of spring and the warmth of summer, stretching towards their peak at the Summer Solstice. 

Most ancient cultures celebrated this return of light and life with feasting, music, light and fire, and for many, it was the true beginning of the New Year.

It was so important to the pre-Celt ancients of Ireland that they spent over 30 years building a monument to the returning sun:  Newgrange.

Older than Stonehenge and the pyramids of Giza, it was designed so that on the Winter Solstice, the rising sun shines directly along the long passage into the inner chamber and for 17 minutes illuminates the chamber floor and the symbols etched on the back wall.

What did the Ancients know that we don’t?

It’s hard for the modern mind to imagine spending 30 years building something to celebrate a three-day event.  Yet, that’s how important the Winter Solstice was to the ancients.

There are still traditional cultures around the world today that believe that the ceremonies they conduct on a daily, monthly and yearly basis keep the earth spinning on its axis.  I share their belief.

A Thanksgiving Prayer

thanksgiving prayerThanksgiving prayers are common to most religious groups.  Native Americans had entire ceremonies just for the purpose of expressing thanks – sometimes these ceremonies last for days.

This Thanksgiving Prayer comes from the Seneca Nation and is at least 500 years old.

It is traditionally done around a fire, with spiritual food on the altar.  I have adapted it to be used as a Thanksgiving Prayer on our national holiday:

Seneca Thanksgiving Prayer 

And now we are gathered together to remember the Great Mystery’s first instruction to us: to love one another always, we who move about on this earth.

And the Great Mystery said that when even two people meet, they should first greet each other by saying:  “Nyah Weh Skenno” which translates to “thank you for being” and then they may take up the matter with which they are concerned.  

[Nyah Weh Skenno more literally means: “thank you for being alive in the here and now and not adding to the confusion of the world.]

The Great Mystery gave us our lives and requires in return only that we be grateful and love one another.  The purpose of this prayer is to pass on those instructions and give us the opportunity to express our gratitude.

So the first thing we will do is give thanks for our lives.

Page 1 of 5 1 2 3 4 5
Viewing Options List View Grid View