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Native American spirituality – three myths laid to rest

native american spiritualityIn my years of “walking the red road” as well as well as living in the non-Indian world, I’ve come across a few misconceptions about Native American spirituality that I’d like to lay to rest.

Here are the most common misconceptions I’ve heard:

  1. Native Americans idolize things such as bison [buffalo] skulls and nature.
  2. Native Americans don’t believe in God.
  3. Native Americans believe in ghosts.

None of the above is true. Here’s what is true as to what Native Americans believe in:

One: Respecting, appreciating and protecting all life

That includes the natural world and animals. And not just four legged animals, but

two-legged [humans],

wingeds [birds],

swimmers [fish],

creepy crawlers [insects],

the tall standing brothers [trees] and

the green nation [everything else on earth].

While a bison skull may be seen in Native American ceremonies, it is not being worshipped any more than the statues of the saints in a church are worshipped.

“We” versus “I” — Which do you say the most?

we versus I“We” versus “I” – which you say the most may determine your success in life.

As a Keith Urban fan, I make a point of listening to interviews with him. Something caught my attention earlier this year when he was being interviewed about his duet with Miranda Lambert on their hit song, “When We Were Us.”

Urban said “Miranda used to open for us…”

Note that this megastar musician who is backed up by his own band said “us” not “me.” He considers his band as important in the equation of success as he is.

That’s class.

And it also shows a high consciousness.

“Us” and “we” consciousness is what makes the world go around in a good way.

“I” and “me” – not so much.

No successful person says “I”

Ernesto Sirolli in his September 2012 TED talk has this to say on the subject:

Why Facebook may save the world

facebookI love Facebook, and not for the usual reasons.

I joined kicking and screaming about five years ago after my Australian friend Barbara convinced me it was a great way to stay in touch with friends around the world.

She was right, but I’ve found it’s also so much more.

“Between Twitter and Facebook and how close you can be with your fans and how close they can be to you these days is, I think, quite miraculous. It’s like getting a greeting card every single day.” Holland Roden, actress

Facebook was founded by Mark Zuckerberg in a Harvard dorm room in 2003 and has since changed the way we live our lives.

Is it misused? Of course. But the good it is doing can’t be minimized – it’s connecting the world, or at least the half a billion people worldwide who use it.

Facebook is an excellent example of the old saying: “you get out of it what you put into it.”

Here is what I don’t do on Facebook

  1. I don’t play games [with the exception of an occasional online Scrabble game with my friend Wanda].
  2. I don’t take surveys to find out what kind of flower, animal or moonbeam I am. Turns out many of these quizzes are actually data mining tools for advertisers. Ever notice the ads on the right of the page are for things you have searched for or were answers on these quizzes? We’re going to be seeing more of these games, so just be discerning.
  3. I don’t post much personal information.
  4. I don’t complain. In fact, I have unfriended many people who use Facebook that way. If you’re not contributing to the raising of the vibration of the planet, I don’t want to interact with you. This may sound harsh but we’re living in a time of great danger to our planet. In the words of Buckminster Fuller, “There are no passengers on Spaceship Earth.” Either contribute to solutions or step aside.
  5. I don’t stalk or bully people.

“I didn’t know what Facebook was, and now that I do know what it is, I have to say, it sounds like a huge waste of time. I would never say the people on it are losers, but that’s only because I’m polite. People say ‘But Betty, Facebook is a great way to connect with old friends.’ Well at my age, if I wanna connect with old friends, I need a Ouija Board. Needless to say, we didn’t have Facebook when I was growing up. We had a phonebook, but you wouldn’t waste an afternoon with it.” Betty White, 92-year old American actress and comedian

 Here’s what I do on Facebook

  1. Post and share inspiring articles, photos and quotes. My favorite sites are Zig Ziglar and The Mind Unleashed. If I’m feeling a little down, taking a look at Facebook for the inspiration shared by my friends and my “liked” organizations is a great pick-me-up.
  2. Occasionally announce a class or event I’m hosting.
  3. Take a look at friends and family pages to see photos they’ve posted and get updates on their travels, etc.
  4. Get the important news that mainstream media won’t touch, particularly about health and the environment. Facebook is the only place to get the full story about GMOs, environmental pollution by big business, etc. Did you know that foods labeled “USDA Organic” are not actually organic?? I learned that from a very intelligent, well-researched article on Facebook. Of course, you have to be discerning and consider the source, because there are many false articles, too.
  5. Comment on issues I find important and of interest.
  6. Private message friends who’s emails I don’t have. Emails can change, but FB private messaging will likely always be there. I’ve found that many people spend more time on Facebook than checking e-mail, so private messaging may be a faster way to reach them.

 Little known Facebook facts:

• Facebook encourages community and communication. Did you know that anything you post on Facebook only gets seen by about 16% of your friends or fans?

And the ones likely to see your posts are those who interact with you most often through likes, shares and comments. So, the more you comment on and share posts from a particular source, the more of them you’ll see.

“The thing that we are trying to do at Facebook, is just help people connect and communicate more efficiently.” Mark Zuckerberg, founder of Facebook

• In 2011, Facebook was sited as a reason for a third of divorces, according to Divorce – Online, a British divorce firm. The most common reasons cited were inappropriate messages to members of the opposite sex, separated spouses posting nasty comments about each other, and Facebook friends reporting spouse’s behavior.

It once again comes down to the fact that we all need to take responsibility for our actions and be discerning.

• The general consensus by experts is that Facebook has facilitated political protests around the world, such as in Columbia and the Arab Spring: communication through social media is hard for oppressive regimes to control unless they shut the down the internet entirely.

Facebook is bringing the world together… It has become an overarching common cultural experience for people worldwide, especially young people….It’s membership spans generations, geographies, languages and class. It changes how people communicate and interact, how marketers sell products, how governments reach out to citizens, even how companies operate. It is altering the character of political activism, and in some countries it is starting to affect the processes of democracy itself.” David Kirkpatrick in The Facebook Effect: The Inside Story of the Company That Is Connecting the World

“Facebook was not originally created to be a company. It was built to accomplish a social mission – to make the world more open and connected.” Mark Zuckerberg

And isn’t that what we all want?

There is great good to be accomplished by open communication among the 99% of the world. Let’s all use social media for the good it can do.

 

Why we need the salt of the earth

“Let there be work, bread, water and salt for all.” Nelson Mandela

salt
Salt has a bad reputation, through no fault of its own. It’s come about because most people use commercial table salt, an unhealthy concoction which we shouldn’t be ingesting in the first place.

Not all salt is created equal. Natural salt from the earth is what we should be using, and the results can contribute greatly to good health. Commercial table salt does just the opposite.

To the ancients, salt was as valuable as gold

Indigenous people have always known the importance of natural salt.

Some years ago, I was in a purification lodge on the Navajo reservation in New Mexico. It was hot, potentially draining, and, in addition to passing around water, the ceremony leader passed around a bag of salt chips mined from a local abandoned salt mine in order to help us replace the salt our bodies were losing from sweating.

The discovery of salt as a preserving agent allowed previously nomadic peoples to become stable by giving them the ability to keep food from spoiling – it allowed them to build reserves in anticipation of periods when hunting was poor.

For a period of 3,000 years, until the advent of sterilization and refrigeration, salt was the only means of preserving food.

The Gospel of St. Matthew refers to those who bear the word of Christ as the “salt of the earth.”

In the ancient trade route it was called “white gold.”

The Latin root of salt, sal, is the origin of the word salary –salt was so highly valued it was used as payment for services rendered.

Why commercial table salt is not our friend

The commercial table salt we buy at the supermarket is one more example of humanity trying to improve upon Mother Nature and failing yet again.

Commercial white table salt sold in supermarkets as salt is not real salt – it’s been so processed that very little nutritional value remains.

That’s why it causes us so many health problems and doctors warn us to reduce our salt intake.

  • It’s been “purified” at over 1200 F. – changing its chemical structure.
  • The reason commercial table salt can raise blood pressure is that it has a high content of sodium without enough magnesium to balance it.
  • Table salt consists of 97.5% sodium chloride – too much – and 2.5% additives. Natural salt consists of just 85% sodium chloride and 15% trace minerals.
  • Refined salt has been bleached and the natural minerals which keep our blood pressure stable have been removed. Its also been exposed to toxic chemicals in the process, such as anti-caking compounds to make it pour more easily.
  • The anti-clumping chemicals added to commercial table salt also inhibit its ability to regulate hydration in your body.
  • Regulating our hydration is one of salt’s main functions. Sodium is necessary for our bodies to regulate fluids and blood pressure, and to keep muscles and nerves running smoothly. The refining process table salt goes through removes all the minerals that keep blood pressure stable.
  • Studies have shown that table salt absorbs 20 times its weight in water so that the body can neutralize the sodium chloride. As a result, we can end up dehydrated.

The only three types of salt you should consider using 

Natural salt from the earth is what we should be using. The three most popular are: Himalayan pink salt, Celtic sea salt, and “Real Salt.” They contain enough magnesium and other necessary trace minerals to support health. 

  • Real Salt” is an all-natural unrefined sea salt harvested from an ancient dried ocean in Redmond, Utah.
  • Celtic Sea Salt is harvested by hand from the current ocean in the salt flats in Brittany, France. Because our oceans are so polluted, some question the purity of salt that comes from our current oceans, but I still use Celtic sea salt.
  • Himalayan Pink salt is harvested from an ancient ocean salt deposit in Pakistan.

Each of these salts provide all the trace minerals needed by the human body for optimal health and longevity.

For example, Himalayan pink salt:

  • Contains 84 essential minerals required by the human body
  • Consists of 85% sodium chloride and 15% trace minerals
  • Is a good source of magnesium, in which 80% of all individuals are deficient
  • Promotes healthy pH balance of the cells
  • Helps regulate blood sugar levels
  • Helps regulate the body’s natural sleep cycle 

Teachings from Dr. Batman about salt

Dr. Fereydoon Batmanghelidj [aka Dr.Batman], author of Your Body’s Many Cries for Water, was a highly respected health advocate. He recommended:

  • drinking half your body weight in ounces of clean water each day;
  • and adding ¼ – ½ tsp of unrefined natural salt to each quart of drinking water.

More salt is needed during hot weather and after exercising.

Metaphysical uses of salt

  • Salt is considered a powerful absorber of psychic energy and can be used for cleansing and purification.
  • Salt lamps around the home release healing negative ions into the air, increasing oxygen flow to the brain, helping to relieve stress and boost energy. I use them in my healing room and by my computer to counteract the effects of the electromagnetic waves of my computer and office equipment.
  • Salt baths: take a shower first, so you are physically clean. The purpose of a salt bath is energetic cleansing to remove negativity. Use 3 handfuls of sea salt. Soak in the tub and submerge yourself, too. As the tub drains, visualize any negativity that has been surrounding you going out with the water.
  • Sprinkle salt around the house and doorways for protection. Sprinkle it on the carpets [5 tsp for a medium room], wait an hour, then vacuum it up.
  • The Irish used to throw a handful of salt under the bed.

You can’t improve on Mother Nature – and natural salt of the earth is a prime example. Go to your health food store and buy natural salt from the earth– your body will thank you!

“There must be something strangely sacred in salt. It is in our tears and in the sea.” Kahlil Gibran

 

References:

David Brownstein, M.D., “Salt Your Way to Health”

www.DrSircus.com

www.realsalt.com

http://higherperspective.com/2014/01/benefits-himalayan-pink-salt.html?utm_source=MAM

www.bodyunburdened.com

Clemence Lefevre, “Himalayan Salt Crystal Lamps for Healing, Harmony and Purification”

The U.S. Constitution and the Great Law of Peace

u.s. constitution“The history of the U.S. Constitution we weren’t taught in school”, first published here in 2012, has turned out to be one of my most popular posts. I thought a repeat this holiday week would be appropriate.

Only the title of the post has changed:

If you’re like me, I learned in grade school that the U.S. Constitution was based on ancient Greek democracy. Which was a creative stretch of the truth, since ancient Greece was not a democracy.

My research as to what children are taught today about the origin of our government is also disappointing, although there are some states that have updated the teachings to include Native American influence.

Apparently the Founding Fathers simply created it out of thin air, or were influenced by European governments even though there was no democracy anywhere in Europe at that time.

The True History of the U.S. Constitution

The truth is that the U.S. Constitution is modeled in both principle and form on the Great Law of Peace of the Native American tribe known as the Iroquois.

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