Archive for the ‘Qualities of Being’ Category
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How to find the sacred in everyday life

sacred in daily life

This post was first published on www.tinybuddha.com

“Enjoy the little things, for one day you may look back and find they were the big things.” Robert Brault

One of the things I love about the Native American spiritual path is the focus on appreciating the simple things in life.

Simple things are often hard to relate to in today’s world of overwhelm.

Eric Schmidt, executive chairman of Google, says we human beings currently create as much information in two days as we did from the dawn of civilization up through 2003!

And yet our bodies were, and still are, designed to be in tune with the sun, the moon, the seasons, and the cycles of nature. That simplicity is what our souls long for.

Molly Larkin is the co-author of the international best-seller "The Wind Is My Mother; The Life and Teachings of a Native American Shaman.” She is passionate about helping people live life to their fullest potential through her classes and blog at www.MollyLarkin.com

Memorial Day: Earn it!

Memorial DayThis post was first published in May 2012.

“James, earn this… earn it.” Dying words of Capt. John Miller to Private James Ryan in the film, Saving Private Ryan

Officially, Memorial Day in the United States is a day for remembering and honoring all Americans who died in any war.

Unfortunately, Memorial Day weekend also marks the beginning of the summer holiday, with people focusing on shopping, family gatherings, picnics and sporting events. So we sometimes forget the real meaning of the Day.

I suggest that each of us take time out from this holiday weekend to say a prayer of thanks for those that gave of their lives so that we could live ours in freedom.

My Uncle Frank

One day during World War II, my grandmother, Nana Sue, was shopping with her oldest daughter when she suddenly felt very weak and had to be helped to the car.

It wasn’t a heart attack; she had a strong premonition that one of her sons had just died.

Molly Larkin is the co-author of the international best-seller "The Wind Is My Mother; The Life and Teachings of a Native American Shaman.” She is passionate about helping people live life to their fullest potential through her classes and blog at www.MollyLarkin.com

How to overcome your limiting beliefs

limiting beliefs“Treat a man as he is, and he will remain as he is. Treat a man as he could be, and he will become what he should be.” Ralph Waldo Emerson

That goes for how we treat ourselves, too.

I just listened to a talk by one of my mentors, Brendon Burchard. He made an interesting point about ending our focus on limiting beliefs and instead focusing on what works.

Brendon related the following email conversation he had with one of his coaching clients:

Client: “But what about my doubts and fears?

Brendon: “What of them? They’re not going to go away. The question is, are they winning the day, or are you? What of your greatness and power? When you connect there, finally, after all this time, your insecurities will be irrelevant.”

We’ve heard it before: what we focus on expands.

Do you want to focus on your problems? Or what works?

Many people tend to focus on disorder, abnormalities or what’s holding them back.

Focus on virtues and strengths, instead of your weaknesses.

Brendon went on to say, “Some people say, ‘My limiting beliefs are sabotaging me.’ It’s not your limiting beliefs, it’s your limiting vision of who you are and what you’re capable of.”

Everything can be reframed, everything. Even the most difficult circumstances we go through.

I attended a seminar many years ago in which a woman was bemoaning the fact that her mother never wanted her, and, while pregnant, tried to abort her.

The seminar leader’s remarkable response was, “Your mother tried to abort you, and you’re here anyway. Look how powerful you are! You’re clearly here for a purpose. Find it and live it.”

Molly Larkin is the co-author of the international best-seller "The Wind Is My Mother; The Life and Teachings of a Native American Shaman.” She is passionate about helping people live life to their fullest potential through her classes and blog at www.MollyLarkin.com

The Japanese Tea Ceremony – the sacred in every day life

japanese tea ceremonyI love to look for the sacred in every day life. And there may be no better example than the opportunity offered by mindfully drinking a simple cup of tea, as in the Japanese Tea Ceremony.

Whether gazing out the window, or going through the formality of a Japanese tea ceremony, there is tranquility and grace to be found there.

I only became a tea drinker very recently, which is interesting since I’m Irish and they are great tea drinkers.

But I try to stay up do date on all health news and when I learned that a cup of green tea a day was good for us, and someone gave me a box of tea for my birthday a few years ago, I was off and running.

Ironically, once I started having a cup of green tea a day, I learned the latest prescription was four cups a day! Oh, well.

I don’t really want to drink four cups a day, but have been pretty steady at having one cup a day of either green, white or red tea, all of which are said to have great healing properties.

The Japanese are reputed to have the lowest rate of heart disease in the world. Diet is a big part of that, but also, 50% of Japanese drink three cups of green tea day!

And there are over 1000 studies showing that green tea helps prevent heart disease.

 The Japanese Tea Ceremony

The Japanese tea ceremony, also known as The Way of Tea, is a beautiful example of finding the sacred in every day life.

Molly Larkin is the co-author of the international best-seller "The Wind Is My Mother; The Life and Teachings of a Native American Shaman.” She is passionate about helping people live life to their fullest potential through her classes and blog at www.MollyLarkin.com

Why having a role model can change your life

role model

Do you sometimes wish you had someone to answer all your questions and tell you how to run your life?

Tell you which path to take when you’re at a cross-roads?

I’ve wished for that many times.

When life seems confusing and hard, it would be so nice to have someone we respect just say, “Here, why not take this path. This is what you should do.”

Well, the fact is, we all do have people like that in our lives. They’re called role models.

Why we all need role models

Role models are people who can impact our lives in a positive way.

Most of us have heard the phrase, “What would Jesus do?”

But perhaps we don’t even ask the question, because it seems too high a standard for us to relate to.

Tony Robbins addresses this in this simple quote: “Perfection is the lowest possible measure – it keeps you from trying.”

But that doesn’t mean there aren’t other ways to ask it, or other people to model our behavior after.

At times when I’ve been faced with difficult situations, I found my way through by asking, “What would Bear Heart do?”

Molly Larkin is the co-author of the international best-seller "The Wind Is My Mother; The Life and Teachings of a Native American Shaman.” She is passionate about helping people live life to their fullest potential through her classes and blog at www.MollyLarkin.com
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