Archive for the ‘The natural world’ Category
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Did you ask the turtle?

ask the turtle

“Did you ask the turtle?”

That’s a question Gloria Steinham was asked in college after helping a turtle to the other side of the road.

It’s a cautionary tale about wanting to help people who don’t need our help.

That can be a hard lesson to learn.

Gloria Steinem, writer and leader of the women’s rights movement, gave a talk to Smith College alumni about lessons from her education, about how seemingly small incidents can have very big impacts.

At Smith, needing to fulfill her science course requirements, Ms. Steinem admitted she took a geology course because she considered it the least scientific of all the sciences.

While on a field trip in the wetlands of New England’s Connecticut River, she saw a giant turtle which had climbed out of the river, crossed a road and was in the mud of an embankment of another road, seemingly about to crawl up and get squashed by a car.

Gloria, fearing the turtle was going to cross the road and get run over, picked it up and carried it to the other side.

Her professor saw this and said, “Did you ask the turtle before you moved it? That turtle probably spent a week crawling up that dirt road to lay its eggs in the mud by the side of the road, and you just put it back in the river.”

So the lesson was, “Always ask the turtle.”

Or put another way, always ask those you want to help what it is they actually need and want.

Why we need the salt of the earth

“Let there be work, bread, water and salt for all.” Nelson Mandela

salt
Salt has a bad reputation, through no fault of its own. It’s come about because most people use commercial table salt, an unhealthy concoction which we shouldn’t be ingesting in the first place.

Not all salt is created equal. Natural salt from the earth is what we should be using, and the results can contribute greatly to good health. Commercial table salt does just the opposite.

To the ancients, salt was as valuable as gold

Indigenous people have always known the importance of natural salt.

Some years ago, I was in a purification lodge on the Navajo reservation in New Mexico. It was hot, potentially draining, and, in addition to passing around water, the ceremony leader passed around a bag of salt chips mined from a local abandoned salt mine in order to help us replace the salt our bodies were losing from sweating.

The discovery of salt as a preserving agent allowed previously nomadic peoples to become stable by giving them the ability to keep food from spoiling – it allowed them to build reserves in anticipation of periods when hunting was poor.

For a period of 3,000 years, until the advent of sterilization and refrigeration, salt was the only means of preserving food.

The Gospel of St. Matthew refers to those who bear the word of Christ as the “salt of the earth.”

In the ancient trade route it was called “white gold.”

The Latin root of salt, sal, is the origin of the word salary –salt was so highly valued it was used as payment for services rendered.

Why commercial table salt is not our friend

The commercial table salt we buy at the supermarket is one more example of humanity trying to improve upon Mother Nature and failing yet again.

Commercial white table salt sold in supermarkets as salt is not real salt – it’s been so processed that very little nutritional value remains.

That’s why it causes us so many health problems and doctors warn us to reduce our salt intake.

  • It’s been “purified” at over 1200 F. – changing its chemical structure.
  • The reason commercial table salt can raise blood pressure is that it has a high content of sodium without enough magnesium to balance it.
  • Table salt consists of 97.5% sodium chloride – too much – and 2.5% additives. Natural salt consists of just 85% sodium chloride and 15% trace minerals.
  • Refined salt has been bleached and the natural minerals which keep our blood pressure stable have been removed. Its also been exposed to toxic chemicals in the process, such as anti-caking compounds to make it pour more easily.
  • The anti-clumping chemicals added to commercial table salt also inhibit its ability to regulate hydration in your body.
  • Regulating our hydration is one of salt’s main functions. Sodium is necessary for our bodies to regulate fluids and blood pressure, and to keep muscles and nerves running smoothly. The refining process table salt goes through removes all the minerals that keep blood pressure stable.
  • Studies have shown that table salt absorbs 20 times its weight in water so that the body can neutralize the sodium chloride. As a result, we can end up dehydrated.

The only three types of salt you should consider using 

Natural salt from the earth is what we should be using. The three most popular are: Himalayan pink salt, Celtic sea salt, and “Real Salt.” They contain enough magnesium and other necessary trace minerals to support health. 

  • Real Salt” is an all-natural unrefined sea salt harvested from an ancient dried ocean in Redmond, Utah.
  • Celtic Sea Salt is harvested by hand from the current ocean in the salt flats in Brittany, France. Because our oceans are so polluted, some question the purity of salt that comes from our current oceans, but I still use Celtic sea salt.
  • Himalayan Pink salt is harvested from an ancient ocean salt deposit in Pakistan.

Each of these salts provide all the trace minerals needed by the human body for optimal health and longevity.

For example, Himalayan pink salt:

  • Contains 84 essential minerals required by the human body
  • Consists of 85% sodium chloride and 15% trace minerals
  • Is a good source of magnesium, in which 80% of all individuals are deficient
  • Promotes healthy pH balance of the cells
  • Helps regulate blood sugar levels
  • Helps regulate the body’s natural sleep cycle 

Teachings from Dr. Batman about salt

Dr. Fereydoon Batmanghelidj [aka Dr.Batman], author of Your Body’s Many Cries for Water, was a highly respected health advocate. He recommended:

  • drinking half your body weight in ounces of clean water each day;
  • and adding ¼ – ½ tsp of unrefined natural salt to each quart of drinking water.

More salt is needed during hot weather and after exercising.

Metaphysical uses of salt

  • Salt is considered a powerful absorber of psychic energy and can be used for cleansing and purification.
  • Salt lamps around the home release healing negative ions into the air, increasing oxygen flow to the brain, helping to relieve stress and boost energy. I use them in my healing room and by my computer to counteract the effects of the electromagnetic waves of my computer and office equipment.
  • Salt baths: take a shower first, so you are physically clean. The purpose of a salt bath is energetic cleansing to remove negativity. Use 3 handfuls of sea salt. Soak in the tub and submerge yourself, too. As the tub drains, visualize any negativity that has been surrounding you going out with the water.
  • Sprinkle salt around the house and doorways for protection. Sprinkle it on the carpets [5 tsp for a medium room], wait an hour, then vacuum it up.
  • The Irish used to throw a handful of salt under the bed.

You can’t improve on Mother Nature – and natural salt of the earth is a prime example. Go to your health food store and buy natural salt from the earth– your body will thank you!

“There must be something strangely sacred in salt. It is in our tears and in the sea.” Kahlil Gibran

 

References:

David Brownstein, M.D., “Salt Your Way to Health”

www.DrSircus.com

www.realsalt.com

http://higherperspective.com/2014/01/benefits-himalayan-pink-salt.html?utm_source=MAM

www.bodyunburdened.com

Clemence Lefevre, “Himalayan Salt Crystal Lamps for Healing, Harmony and Purification”

Bear Heart, humility, and praying for snow

praying for snow

In 1988, Colorado was experiencing a snow drought.

I know that seems hard to imagine after the winter we just went through, but that was the case back then.

The Copper Mountain Ski Resort was close to having to lay off staff and close, so the owner, a friend of Bear Heart’s, invited him to Colorado to pray for snow.

Before Bear Heart finished his ceremony, a heavy snow storm came in; one that the meteorologists had not predicted.

It was so unexpected that Bear Heart was featured on the cover of the Rocky Mountain News. He was also interviewed by the television news show “A Current Affair” to discuss his praying for snow.

The video below is a short excerpt from a longer interview by veteran reporter Mike Watkiss.

Are you thriving? Or merely surviving?

thrivingAre you thriving? Or merely surviving?

The first is not as hard to achieve as you might think.

Lessons from a cactus garden

In 1999 I bought my first house – in the San Fernando Valley of Southern California.

Earth lover that I am, I was excited about landscaping and, since the San Fernando Valley is a bit of a desert, that meant using native plants that would grow with the rainfall and sun usual for that area. Or so I thought.

My friends Bob and Laura were professional landscapers and offered to give me a landscaping consultation as a housewarming gift.

When I told them I wanted drought-tolerant plants and a cactus garden, the last thing I was expecting was the suggestion to put in a sprinkler system. But that’s exactly what they recommended.

Bob and Laura explained that, even with drought-tolerant plants, having a sprinkler system would make the difference between my garden thriving versus merely surviving.

Of course I wanted my garden to thrive, so I followed their advice, put in sprinklers, and never regretted it.

So what does this have to do with the rest of our lives? Plenty.

Why is the world’s largest garbage patch in the ocean?

garbage patchDid you know the world’s largest garbage patch is in the ocean?

And that it consists of what was once hailed as a great future?

In the 1967 film, The Graduate, starring Dustin Hoffman, the new college graduate is cornered by a friend of the family with advice for his future:

Mr. McGuire: I want to say one word to you. Just one word.
Benjamin: Yes, sir.
Mr. McGuire: Are you listening?
Benjamin: Yes, I am.
Mr. McGuire: Plastics.
Benjamin: Exactly how do you mean?
Mr. McGuire: There’s a great future in plastics. Think about it. Will you think about it?

[Note: the bolded line is ranked #42 in the American Film Institute's list of the top 100 movie quotations in American cinema.]

Little did we know that the great future of plastics could turn out to be The Great Pacific Garbage Patch – and a persistent tragedy on our planet.

Sadly, very few people even know about it.

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch

A quick oceanography lesson:

A gyre is a naturally occurring vortex of wind and currents that rotate in clockwise direction in the northern hemisphere, and counterclockwise in the southern hemisphere.

There are five major oceanic gyres on the planet. The North Pacific Gyre is the largest ecosystem on Earth and it covers most of the Northern Pacific Ocean. It has a clockwise circular pattern formed by four prevailing ocean currents.

The whirlpool effect of the gyre collects plastic debris that has been discarded into the ocean. An ironic example of The Law of Attraction at work.

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