Archive for the ‘History’ Category
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The history of the U.S. Constitution we weren’t taught in school

This post on the U.S. Constitution first appeared on my blog on July 3, 2012.  It has been a popular post, and I felt it deserved to be re-published this year. I hope you enjoy it.

christopher ColumbusIf you’re like me, I was taught in grade school that the U.S. Constitution was based on ancient Greek democracy.  This is quite a stretch, since ancient Greece government was not democratic.

My research into what children are taught today about the origin of our government is also disappointing.

Apparently the founding fathers simply created it out of thin air, or were influenced by European governments.  This is despite the fact there was no democracy anywhere in Europe at that time.

The True History of the U.S Constitution

The truth is that the U.S. Constitution is modeled in both principle and form on the Great Law of Peace of the Native American Nation  known as the Iroquois.

This is absolutely, unequivocally historical fact.

Molly Larkin is the co-author of the international best-seller "The Wind Is My Mother; The Life and Teachings of a Native American Shaman.” She is passionate about helping people live life to their fullest potential through her classes and blog at www.MollyLarkin.com

The nature of wolves and the nature of man

nature of wolvesThe nature of wolves is something the average person doesn’t usually give any thought to.  And yet most Native Americans are very aware of the wolf nation, their gifts and their nature. 

So I thought it would be worth a blog post.  Because wolves are in great danger now, and they need our help.

My first introduction to the nature of wolves

Years ago, my very favorite TV show was “The West Wing”  — a fictional show about what goes on behind the scenes in the running of the presidency and our country.

One episode that stands out in my mind was the fictional workday during which senior staff met with fringe special interest groups.  Not the kind of special interest groups that have expensive lobbyists behind them.   Special interest groups that have no money but a forward-thinking idea.

One might call them seventh generation” ideas.

No one in the West Wing ever looked forward to those meetings; they considered the people coming to meet with them to be promoting off-the-wall causes.  But they had to take these meetings; it was part of their job.

And here was the great part:  by the end of each meeting, each west wing staff member usually had “got it” – they were convinced by the presentations and ready to champion their cause.  And the viewer got educated as we watched each presentation, too.

The fictional proposal that stands out in my mind was the presentation made to fictional White House Press Secretary CJ Cregg for the protection of wolves.  Specifically a $900 million highway for wolves that facilitate their safe travel from Yellowstone to Banff National Park in Canada.

I learned that wolves have to breed with many packs in order to keep from becoming extinct.  Because if they only breed within their pack, they’ll produce offspring that are genetically weaker, thus endangering their long-term survival.  Breeding with other packs assures their long-term survival.  What’s remarkable to me about that fact is that: the wolves somehow know this!

Their territories often cover 1,000 square miles.

But in the 1990s, Pluie, a gray wolf with a radio collar was tracked as she traveled within a 40,000 square mile range in pursuit of new breeding grounds.  Yes, that was 40,000 square miles.  Not a typo.

The journeys of these wolves can be dangerous: across highways, housing, forests denuded of trees and over the U.S./Canadian border. Pluie, her mate and three pups were legally shot and killed by a rancher in Canada in 1995.

So the fictional proposal in this fictional TV show was to build a wolves only highway, to ensure their safe travel.

[In actual fact, there is a successful wildlife crossing bridge in Banff National Park in Canada that has reduced the animal/car collision rate by 80%.  And there are plans underway for other wildlife crossing bridges in various parts of the United States.]

Initially entrenched in the stand that, “this will never happen,” CJ ends up a passionate advocate for wolves and their safety:  “Why can’t we build schools and protect wildlife at the same time?”  Good question.

Of course, that was all fiction.  Now lets move on to reality.

Molly Larkin is the co-author of the international best-seller "The Wind Is My Mother; The Life and Teachings of a Native American Shaman.” She is passionate about helping people live life to their fullest potential through her classes and blog at www.MollyLarkin.com

What is the 7th Generation principle and why do you need to know about it?

hillsideWhenever I mention the 7th Generation principle to most people, they think I’m talking about laundry detergent.

I’m always surprised that more people don’t know the origin of the term, so I felt it deserved a post of its own.

The “7th generation” principle taught by Native Americans says that in every decision, be it personal, governmental or corporate, we must consider how it will affect our descendents seven generations into the future.  So that the pristine sky, field and mountains in this photo will still be here for them to enjoy.

[Western society generally considers a generation to be 25 years; the Lakota Nation considers one generation to be 100 years]..

It is clearly not embraced by most governments and corporations in the world today. I mean, when was the last time any of us thought about who’s coming along seven generations from now?

The 7th generation principal was so important to Native American cultures that it was codified in the Iroquois Great Law of Peace. To my knowledge, all Native American and indigenous tribes throughout the world embrace this teaching.

Those of us descended from the European culture have generally not given it a second thought.

Long before environmentalists got us thinking about “carbon footprints” and “sustainability,” indigenous peoples lived in balance with the world around them.

It’s even defined in their language:

Molly Larkin is the co-author of the international best-seller "The Wind Is My Mother; The Life and Teachings of a Native American Shaman.” She is passionate about helping people live life to their fullest potential through her classes and blog at www.MollyLarkin.com

Why An Open Mind is the Way to World Peace

an open mindMy father taught me many wonderful things, mostly by example, which is the best way to learn. One of the things I most admire about him was that he had a very open mind and respected differing viewpoints. 

That is refreshing in this day and age when people are quick to “unfriend” people who don’t see things the way they do. 

I recall the time my father was at a football game sitting in front of someone rooting for the opposing team. His friend asked why he wasn’t upset about it and my father’s response was simply, “Well, that’s what makes a horse race.” 

When I joined a cult in the 1970s, my father maintained a very open, wait and see attitude before judging me and my guru. He and my mother came to hear my teacher speak and to learn more about what I was involved in. I really didn’t know many parents who were doing that at that time. 

In fact, my father told me about a conversation he had with someone critical of my guru: 

Molly Larkin is the co-author of the international best-seller "The Wind Is My Mother; The Life and Teachings of a Native American Shaman.” She is passionate about helping people live life to their fullest potential through her classes and blog at www.MollyLarkin.com

The Winter Solstice — Why It’s the True New Year

Winter Solstice

The sun enters Newgrange on the Winter Solstice

Winter Solstice is the day when light is reborn out of the darkness of winter.

Our days start to become longer and lead us back to the beauty of spring and the warmth of summer, stretching towards their peak at the Summer Solstice.

Most ancient cultures celebrated this return of light and life with feasting, music, light and fire, and for many, it was the true beginning of the New Year.

It was so important to the pre-Celt ancients of Ireland that they spent over 30 years building a monument to the returning sun:  Newgrange.

Older than Stonehenge and the pyramids of Giza, it was designed so that on the Winter Solstice, the rising sun shines directly along the long passage into the inner chamber and for 17 minutes illuminates the chamber floor and the symbols etched on the back wall.

 What did the Ancients know that we don’t?

 It’s hard for the modern mind to imagine spending 30 years building something to celebrate a three-day event.  Yet, that’s how important the Winter Solstice was to the ancients.There are still traditional cultures around the world today that believe that the ceremonies they conduct on a daily, monthly and yearly basis keep the earth spinning on its axis.  I share their belief.The sun has never missed a day of brightening planet earth, but do we want to take that for granted?

We would not be able to live without the sun — it brings warmth and light and allows growing things to flourish.

The time of the Winter Solstice is rich with meaning

Molly Larkin is the co-author of the international best-seller "The Wind Is My Mother; The Life and Teachings of a Native American Shaman.” She is passionate about helping people live life to their fullest potential through her classes and blog at www.MollyLarkin.com
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