Archive

Category Archives for "Human Potential"
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If we could see inside other people’s hearts

“If we could see inside other people’s hearts” is a moving 4-minute video from the Cleveland Clinic, one of the most renowned medical centers in the United States.

I see it as a visual version of the Native American saying, “Don’t judge a person until you’ve walked a mile in their moccasins.”

Enough said. Have a hankie ready.

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What is the 7th Generation principle and why do you need to know about it?

Whenever I mention the 7th Generation principle to most people, they think I’m talking about laundry detergent. I’m always surprised that more people don’t know the origin of the term, so I felt it deserved a post.

The “7th generation” principle taught by Native Americans says that in every decision, be it personal, governmental or corporate, we must consider how it will affect our descendents seven generations into the future. So that the pristine sky, field and mountains in this photo will still be here for them to enjoy.

A generation is generally considered to be 25 years, so that’s 175 years.

It is clearly not embraced by most governments and corporations in the world today. I mean, when was the last time any of us thought about who’s coming along seven generations from now?

The 7th generation principal was so important to Native American cultures that it was codified in the Iroquois Great Law of Peace. To my knowledge, all Native American and indigenous tribes throughout the world embrace this teaching.

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Earthing: why even astronauts need to do it

Do you know what you have in common with astronauts? You both need to be in touch with the energy of Mother Earth in order to be healthy. And “Earthing” [also known as “grounding”] is an easy way to do it.

KEEPING ASTRONAUTS IN TOUCH WITH THE EARTH

We are so dependent on the earth’s energy, also known as her electromagnetic fields [EMF], that when we leave the planet for prolonged periods, we suffer.

The first Astronauts in space for long periods experienced what was called “space sickness” – nausea and disorientation.

The cause was a mystery until one scientist, Prof. Winfried Schumann, theorized it was because the astronauts, upon leaving the earth’s atmosphere, were deprived of the earth’s “song” or electromagnetic resonance.

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The Power of Prayer

The power of prayer can take many forms. Bear Heart said, “Let your every step be as a prayer.”

What does that mean to you?

To me it means walking the earth each day with respect. And it means being ready to offer a prayer at a moment’s notice.

And prayer can take the form of acts of kindness, because that carries the same energy as prayer.

LEARNING HOW TO PRAY

I was raised a Catholic and prayer was something one memorized: the Our Father or the Hail Mary were the two most popular prayers I learned.

When I started attending Native American ceremonies, I was in awe of how people prayed from their heart, in their own words. It took a year or so of being in that environment before I felt comfortable praying out loud in ceremony. Now it’s second nature.

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The First Day of Spring – A Time for Balance

What does the first day of spring mean for us?

This year the spring equinox in the Northern Hemisphere is Wednesday, March 20, 7:02 a.m. Eastern Time: a day of equal balance of the hours of light and dark before the sun continues its journey towards longer daylight hours and warming temperatures.

The equinox energy is strong for four days before and after March 20th, giving us time to bask in the opportunities and lessons it brings.

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How to Improve Your Self-Esteem

In my work as healing practitioner, there is a consistent pattern I’ve discovered when people don’t get well, or don’t achieve a goal: They have low self-esteem and don’t believe they are worthy of health, wealth or success.

And I’m here to encourage you to get over that right now. You absolutely do deserve everything wonderful in life. You are indeed worthy of all good things.

I can think of a few reasons why low self-esteem is so pervasive in our culture:

First, we are surrounded with advertising that inundates us with the message that we have to be slimmer, taller, blonder or better dressed in order to have value.

We’re constantly being compared to supermodels. It’s humiliating. And it’s just plain wrong.

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Checklist for A Perfect Day

How does one start a good habit? Particularly the habit of having a perfect day?

I admit that a checklist for anything, particularly a perfect day, might sound too unspontaneous to be a spiritual undertaking.

But to accomplish anything, we have to be intentional, and really work at it. And work takes time without interruptions, which means being organized. And checklists help with that!

This is my checklist for a perfect day [work day; days off are not so scheduled]. I am a person who finds routine productive and comforting. If you are, too, you may find this checklist helpful. By doing them in order, it guarantees they get done.

Change it to accommodate your lifestyle.

A tip:

If you have a commute to work, put commute time on your schedule. And I highly recommend doing something peaceful or productive during that commute. Listen to a motivating CD, do breathing exercises, or, if you’re a passenger, meditate. Commute time doesn’t have to be wasted time.

THE PERFECT DAY CHECKLIST

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Commitment

I have always believed that commitment to a goal or cause is essential to its success. One can’t be lackadaisical about the intended result.

For 30 years I have carried around in my personal organizer a statement on Commitment written by W.H. Murray in “The Scottish Himalayan Expedition” in 1951.

It seemed about time to share it. Because every word is true:

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Why An Open Mind is the Way to World Peace

My father taught me many wonderful things, mostly by example, which is the best way to learn. One of the things I most admire about him was that he had a very open mind and respected differing viewpoints.

That is refreshing in this day and age when people are quick to “unfriend” people who don’t see things the way they do.

I recall the time my father was at a football game sitting in front of someone rooting for the opposing team. His friend asked why he wasn’t upset about it and my father’s response was simply, “Well, that’s what makes a horse race.”

When I joined a cult in the 1970s, my father maintained a very open, wait and see attitude before judging me and my guru. In fact, he and my mother came to hear my teacher speak and to learn more about what I was involved in. I really didn’t know many parents who were doing that at that time.

In fact, my father told me about a conversation he had with someone critical of my guru:

Dad: Have you gone to hear him speak?

Critic: No

Dad: Have you spoken with members of his group?

Critic: No

Dad: Oh, so you’re an expert!

My father never hesitated to call it like he saw it.

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What Were You Doing While the World Was Falling Apart?

What were you doing while the world was falling apart?

Imagine your great-grandchildren asking you that question. Can you be proud of your answer?

The “seventh generation” principle taught by Native Americans says that in every decision, we must consider how it will affect our descendents seven generations into the future. It is clearly not embraced by most governments and corporations in the world today.

It is also at the heart of the Idle No More movement of the Canadian First Nation People.

The Idle No More movement started in Canada in December 2012 as a response to Canadian Bill C-45 which lowers environmental protection standards for Canadian waterways, much of which passes through the land of indigenous [First Nations] people.

Please remember that before our ancestors came to North America several centuries ago, this entire continent was indigenous land.

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What’s the Opposite of Cyber Bullying?

What’s the opposite of cyber bullying? Cyber compliments!

After reading about the plague of cyber bullying on social media, Jeremiah Anthony of West High School in Iowa City, Iowa decided to do something about it. He started using social media to compliment fellow students instead of bully them. It spread like wildfire.

Jeremiah started tweeting daily compliments to his friends in October 2011. Soon a few of them started a twitter account called @WestHighBros. to send compliments to fellow students. Now the entire school is sending and receiving positive tweets — over 3000 so far!

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Why New Year’s Resolutions Fail and How to Make Goal Setting Succeed

[quote]”Without goals, and plans to reach them, you are like a ship that has set sail with no destination.” Fitzhugh Dodson[/quote] The concept of making “new year’s resolutions” has been a bit of a joke in our society for about as long as I can remember — the joke being that  “resolution” has become synonymous […]

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How to Say Goodbye to 2012

How we say goodbye is important. Including how we say goodbye to 2012.

We’ve all heard that one door never closes without another door opening. But how we close the first door will have an impact on the new door that opens.

Why? Because good transitions are essential to a balanced life. They set the stage for, and welcome, what’s to come.

FIVE-POINT PLAN FOR SAYING A HEALTHY GOODBYE TO 2012:

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The Winter Solstice — Why It’s the True New Year

Winter Solstice is the day when light is reborn out of the darkness of winter.

Our days start to become longer and lead us back to the beauty of spring and the warmth of summer, stretching towards their peak at the Summer Solstice.

Most ancient cultures celebrated this return of light and life with feasting, music, light and fire, and for many, it was the true beginning of the New Year.

It was so important to the pre-Celt ancients of Ireland that they spent over 30 years building a monument to the returning sun: Newgrange.

Older than Stonehenge and the pyramids of Giza, it was designed so that on the Winter Solstice, the rising sun shines directly along the long passage into the inner chamber and for 17 minutes illuminates the chamber floor and the symbols etched on the back wall.

It’s hard for the modern mind to fathom spending 30 years to build a monument for a 3-day event. What did they understand that we don’t?

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Why Is The Butterfly Effect Important for You?

I know how easy it is to feel powerless in today’s complex world. That’s why it’s really important for you to know about The Butterfly Effect.

The Butterfly Effect was first stated in 1963 by mathematician and meteorologist Edward Lorenz, a pioneer in chaos theory.

It states that a butterfly could flap its wings on one side of the world, creating tiny changes in the atmosphere, that in turn set molecules of air in motion that eventually could create [or prevent] a tornado in another part of the world.

So what does that have to do with your life? A lot!

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Are you asking the right questions?

Are you asking the right questions? This occurred to me recently when I was feeling a bit sad for no apparent reason.

Instead of staying stuck there, I stopped and asked myself, “What am I really upset about? What’s really going on here?” And the answer came. There’s always a deeper reason affecting us.

In truth, some of the turning points in my life, and in the life of some of my friends, have come from asking the right questions.

Here’s a list of what I consider some of the best.

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Prophecy of Crazy Horse

This was passed on by Chief Joe Chasing Horse, a relative of Crazy
Horse. He translated it from the words of a grandmother who was
present when the words were spoken.

This is a statement of Crazy Horse as he sat smoking the Sacred Pipe
at Paha Sapa with Sitting Bull for the last time, 4 days before he was
assassinated. Many of these words are often repeated. There is one
line often left out, that of the “young white ones”.

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Why Veterans Day Just Isn’t Enough

To me, Veterans Day, celebrated this Monday November 12, just isn’t enough to honor what our veterans have done for this country.

Although I am a pacifist, and was an active anti-war activist during the Vietnam War, I was ashamed of the way our veterans were treated when they returned home.

And I am still deeply saddened by the lack of support and care our veterans receive today.

Yes, war is horrendous, and perhaps if women were running the world there wouldn’t be any wars. But those who did their duty and fought for us deserve better than one day to celebrate them.

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What is Civilization?

Just what is “civilization?”

I asked myself that question after writing last week’s post about Christopher Columbus not being the first to discover the New World. And his still being celebrated for paving the way for Europeans to bring “civilization” to the west.

Will Durant spent 50 years writing “The Story of Civilization” and says that civilization is marked by four elements:

economic provision

political organization

moral traditions

pursuit of knowledge and the arts

The Native American societies of North America lived by the above principles for centuries before the arrival of Columbus.

Here’s my definition of civilization:

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Does the Energy in Food Matter?

Does the energy in food matter? Absolutely!

One thing that doesn’t get much attention in discussions of our food is how the animals we eat are raised and killed and the energy transmitted along with that.

In other words, what you eat affects more than just your diet.

MEDICAL MYSTERY OR CUTTING EDGE SCIENCE?

But first let me tell you about my friend Pete, who developed a sudden love of dark chocolate after receiving a heart transplant. It mystified his wife, but she heard similar stories in their heart transplant support group.

Unusual? Not at all. There are legions of anecdotal stories about organ transplant recipients taking on new interests and food cravings after their transplants:

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